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Off Roading At Issue in Pendale

More and more cities and towns are restricting off-road areas.

Here’s an example of what can happen and how to avoid it.

Board faces Dec. 8 decision in Pendale zoning dispute By Thomas Prohaska of The Buffalo News PENDLETON – The Town Board probably will make a decision Dec. 8 on whether the use of off-road vehicles, such as dirt bikes, all-terrain vehicles and snowmobiles, violates the town zoning ordinance, but officials said Monday that they wish it hadn’t come to this. Supervisor James A. Riester told an overflow crowd of about 200 people, who overwhelmingly support off-roading, that because a neighbor dispute in the Pendale subdivision already has reached the courts, chances are that whatever the board decides won’t be final. “If everybody works together, then we can get along. If we don’t work together, then the courts decide. I guess that’s how we do things in the United States,” Riester said. He said he hoped the town could avoid having to pass a noise ordinance that might lead to limitations on the use of the town’s existing trails for dirt bikes and snowmobiles. The issue arose earlier this month, when Dominic Saraceno, an attorney who lives in the Pendale subdivision off Tonawanda Creek Road, led a group of nine residents in suing the Donahue family. Matthew Donahue allegedly has a motocross track on his property on Tonawanda Creek Road, backing up to the subdivision, and the plaintiffs complained about what they say is incessant noise from dirt bikes. Much of the sentiment in favor of off-roading was voiced by longtime town residents who scorned the recently transplanted suburbanites who seem to oppose Pendleton’s rural lifestyle. “They’re putting in these ponds. They call them lakes. They think they’re in Paradise or something. Go back to the city or live in Amherst,” John V. Burkett of Sheetram Road said to loud applause. Saraceno told the crowd that he owns two dirt bikes. “This isn’t about dirt biking. This is about being a considerate neighbor,” he said. “This started because (Donahue) rode for four hours straight. These are four-stroke dirt bikes. They sound like nothing you ever heard.” Wrae A. Gorman of Cambria said, “They’re not standing on a corner selling drugs. There’s no drive-by shootings. Be glad they’re riding their damn motorcycles.” The zoning ordinance for an R-2 medium-density residential zone allows “outdoor recreational uses,” specifically listing golf courses, tennis courts and rod and gun clubs. Resident Al Beiter said that another portion of the law says anything not specifically allowed is considered prohibited unless the Town Board decides it’s allowable “and not inherently a nuisance, menace or danger.” Riester said he and the board didn’t want to vote Monday because Councilman David A. Leible was absent. Bottom line: When there’s a zoning dispute, be there and stand your ground. Mudding accident off Card Sound Road kills 9-year-old boy I think the moral of this story is that accidents can happen to anyone, so be careful and keep your head about you when off- roading BY PATRICK RILEYPRILEY of the MIAMIHERALD.COM A 9-year-old boy died in a mudding accident east of Card Sound Road, Miami-Dade police said Monday. A Margate father and his two boys, 6 and 9, were riding off-road in a 1996 Jeep Cherokee about 2½ miles south of the intersection of U.S. 1 and Card Sound Road in South Miami-Dade at about 1:40 p.m. Sunday when the car hit a five-foot- deep, water-filled ditch, said Miami-Dade police Detective Alvaro Zabaleta. The dad, who was driving the Jeep, and his adult passenger got out of the vehicle to push it out of the mud when they noticed that 9-year-old Jayden Young was unconscious on the back seat, Zabaleta said. The two adults pried Jayden out of the car and called 911. He was airlifted to Miami Children’s Hospital with “some type of facial injury,” Zabaleta said. “He was very, very critical,” Zabaleta said. “They weren’t expecting him to make it through the night.” Mudding is common in South Florida, Zabaleta said. “Over there, it’s a lot,” Zabaleta said. “It’s a hobby. Accidents do happen. There’s a lot of dangers involved with off-road driving.” Officers were at the scene Monday morning to investigate the accident. Bottom line: When conditions are bad, like when muddy or wet, be especially careful when off-roading. Even at 20 below, Northwest ‘Off Road Warriors’ jeeped on Here’s an interesting piece about off-roaders in the frozen north country. Yes, you can enjoy off roading in the cold. By Rob Owen Special to The Seattle Times In the History Channel’s new competition series “Alaska Off Road Warriors,” which premieres Sunday, Nov. 30, two Western Washington engineers are introduced as non-Alaska outsiders. Carl Jantz, of Poulsbo, and Rich Rudman, of Kingston, longtime friends, were recruited to bring Jantz’s 4 x 4 CJ5 “Super Jeep” up to Alaska for the man/machine-versus-the-wild race that began near the Pacific, south of Anchorage, and continued north to Deadhorse, near the Arctic Ocean. Initially Rudman, who previously appeared on “Monster Garage,” was approached by an “Alaska Off Road Warriors” producer about competing with an electric 4 x 4 Rudman had written about on his Facebook page. “I ran out of money and never built it, but I told them I knew someone else with a well-built Jeep who has done extreme snow challenges in the Yakima area,” Rudman said. Producers contacted Jantz, 55, a former Boeing machinist who now runs Jantz Engineering. He and Rudman, 52, co-founder of electric-vehicle supply house Manzanita Micro, became a team and headed to Alaska for the race that ran from June to July. “They wanted some guys from the Lower 48 and that was us,” Jantz said. “There was a lot of nervousness: ‘You’re from the United States; we’re from Alaska,’?” Rudman said of the reaction from their Alaska race competitors. Dubbed MacGyver and the Mad Scientist — Rudman bears a resemblance to Christopher Lloyd’s Doc Brown from the “Back to the Future” films — for the past 10 years the pair have attended an annual off-road snow camp between Christmas and New Year’s where they drive in conditions that can get as cold as 20 degrees below zero. “We’re used to that tough environment,” Jantz said. “I think we kind of surprised them. We’re outsiders and they didn’t think we’d be ready for the harsh environment. We just took it in stride.” Their vehicle, which was built in 1942, took it in stride, too. “The challenge was to keep the rig moving,” Rudman said. That was easier said than done, particularly when they encountered mudholes and muskeg. “Tundra is the stuff growing on top,” Jantz explained. “Underneath that is muskeg, the dead rotting plants — in England they’d call it a peat bog — and underneath that in summer is two feet of water and under the water is permafrost. So when you sink through the muskeg, you’ve got nothing [but water].” “The jeep likes to drive over things, not through things,” Rudman added with a laugh. Water also proved a challenge in another setting: Driving up rivers, something the pair have little experience with in Washington (“Down here if you drive in a river valley or salmon stream, they shoot you, hang you, draw and quarter you and throw you in jail,” Rudman said). The path of glacial rivers proved unpredictable due to snowmelt. “We camped at one spot where we saw the river bank move 75 feet in less than two hours,” Jantz said. “So the [race] course is constantly changing.” But despite — or maybe because of — the challenges, these engineers enjoyed their time on “Alaska Off Road Warriors.” “For me and Carl, it’s two months of jeeping,” Rudman said. “We’re having fun. This is playing.” Freelance writer Rob Owen: RobOwenTV@gmail.com or on Facebook and Twitter as RobOwenTV Bottom Line: Whatever the weather, enjoy it ... it’s only weather.

Here are some off-road

resources:

off-road reading cheap auto insurance online off-road warehouse off-road goodies
1ForTheRoad.com
© 2013 - 2015 1ForTheRoad.com

Off-Road

News

Off Roading At Issue in

Pendale

More and more cities

and towns are

restricting off-road

areas. Here’s an

example of what can

happen and how to

avoid it.

Board faces Dec. 8 decision in Pendale zoning dispute By Thomas Prohaska of The Buffalo News PENDLETON – The Town Board probably will make a decision Dec. 8 on whether the use of off-road vehicles, such as dirt bikes, all-terrain vehicles and snowmobiles, violates the town zoning ordinance, but officials said Monday that they wish it hadn’t come to this. Supervisor James A. Riester told an overflow crowd of about 200 people, who overwhelmingly support off- roading, that because a neighbor dispute in the Pendale subdivision already has reached the courts, chances are that whatever the board decides won’t be final. “If everybody works together, then we can get along. If we don’t work together, then the courts decide. I guess that’s how we do things in the United States,” Riester said. He said he hoped the town could avoid having to pass a noise ordinance that might lead to limitations on the use of the town’s existing trails for dirt bikes and snowmobiles. The issue arose earlier this month, when Dominic Saraceno, an attorney who lives in the Pendale subdivision off Tonawanda Creek Road, led a group of nine residents in suing the Donahue family. Matthew Donahue allegedly has a motocross track on his property on Tonawanda Creek Road, backing up to the subdivision, and the plaintiffs complained about what they say is incessant noise from dirt bikes. Much of the sentiment in favor of off-roading was voiced by longtime town residents who scorned the recently transplanted suburbanites who seem to oppose Pendleton’s rural lifestyle. “They’re putting in these ponds. They call them lakes. They think they’re in Paradise or something. Go back to the city or live in Amherst,” John V. Burkett of Sheetram Road said to loud applause. Saraceno told the crowd that he owns two dirt bikes. “This isn’t about dirt biking. This is about being a considerate neighbor,” he said. “This started because (Donahue) rode for four hours straight. These are four-stroke dirt bikes. They sound like nothing you ever heard.” Wrae A. Gorman of Cambria said, “They’re not standing on a corner selling drugs. There’s no drive-by shootings. Be glad they’re riding their damn motorcycles.” The zoning ordinance for an R- 2 medium-density residential zone allows “outdoor recreational uses,” specifically listing golf courses, tennis courts and rod and gun clubs. Resident Al Beiter said that another portion of the law says anything not specifically allowed is considered prohibited unless the Town Board decides it’s allowable “and not inherently a nuisance, menace or danger.” Riester said he and the board didn’t want to vote Monday because Councilman David A. Leible was absent. Bottom line: When there’s a zoning dispute, be there and stand your ground. Mudding accident off Card Sound Road kills 9- year-old boy I think the moral of this story is that accidents can happen to anyone, so be careful and keep your head about you when off-roading BY PATRICK RILEYPRILEY of the MIAMIHERALD.COM A 9-year-old boy died in a mudding accident east of Card Sound Road, Miami-Dade police said Monday. A Margate father and his two boys, 6 and 9, were riding off- road in a 1996 Jeep Cherokee about 2½ miles south of the intersection of U.S. 1 and Card Sound Road in South Miami- Dade at about 1:40 p.m. Sunday when the car hit a five- foot-deep, water-filled ditch, said Miami-Dade police Detective Alvaro Zabaleta. The dad, who was driving the Jeep, and his adult passenger got out of the vehicle to push it out of the mud when they noticed that 9-year-old Jayden Young was unconscious on the back seat, Zabaleta said. The two adults pried Jayden out of the car and called 911. He was airlifted to Miami Children’s Hospital with “some type of facial injury,” Zabaleta said. “He was very, very critical,” Zabaleta said. “They weren’t expecting him to make it through the night.” Mudding is common in South Florida, Zabaleta said. “Over there, it’s a lot,” Zabaleta said. “It’s a hobby. Accidents do happen. There’s a lot of dangers involved with off-road driving.” Officers were at the scene Monday morning to investigate the accident. Bottom line: When conditions are bad, like when muddy or wet, be especially careful when off-roading. Even at 20 below, Northwest ‘Off Road Warriors’ jeeped on Here’s an interesting piece about off-roaders in the frozen north country. Yes, you can enjoy off roading in the cold. By Rob Owen Special to The Seattle Times In the History Channel’s new competition series “Alaska Off Road Warriors,” which premieres Sunday, Nov. 30, two Western Washington engineers are introduced as non-Alaska outsiders. Carl Jantz, of Poulsbo, and Rich Rudman, of Kingston, longtime friends, were recruited to bring Jantz’s 4 x 4 CJ5 “Super Jeep” up to Alaska for the man/machine-versus- the-wild race that began near the Pacific, south of Anchorage, and continued north to Deadhorse, near the Arctic Ocean. Initially Rudman, who previously appeared on “Monster Garage,” was approached by an “Alaska Off Road Warriors” producer about competing with an electric 4 x 4 Rudman had written about on his Facebook page. “I ran out of money and never built it, but I told them I knew someone else with a well-built Jeep who has done extreme snow challenges in the Yakima area,” Rudman said. Producers contacted Jantz, 55, a former Boeing machinist who now runs Jantz Engineering. He and Rudman, 52, co-founder of electric-vehicle supply house Manzanita Micro, became a team and headed to Alaska for the race that ran from June to July. “They wanted some guys from the Lower 48 and that was us,” Jantz said. “There was a lot of nervousness: ‘You’re from the United States; we’re from Alaska,’?” Rudman said of the reaction from their Alaska race competitors. Dubbed MacGyver and the Mad Scientist — Rudman bears a resemblance to Christopher Lloyd’s Doc Brown from the “Back to the Future” films — for the past 10 years the pair have attended an annual off- road snow camp between Christmas and New Year’s where they drive in conditions that can get as cold as 20 degrees below zero. “We’re used to that tough environment,” Jantz said. “I think we kind of surprised them. We’re outsiders and they didn’t think we’d be ready for the harsh environment. We just took it in stride.” Their vehicle, which was built in 1942, took it in stride, too. “The challenge was to keep the rig moving,” Rudman said. That was easier said than done, particularly when they encountered mudholes and muskeg. “Tundra is the stuff growing on top,” Jantz explained. “Underneath that is muskeg, the dead rotting plants — in England they’d call it a peat bog — and underneath that in summer is two feet of water and under the water is permafrost. So when you sink through the muskeg, you’ve got nothing [but water].” “The jeep likes to drive over things, not through things,” Rudman added with a laugh. Water also proved a challenge in another setting: Driving up rivers, something the pair have little experience with in Washington (“Down here if you drive in a river valley or salmon stream, they shoot you, hang you, draw and quarter you and throw you in jail,” Rudman said). The path of glacial rivers proved unpredictable due to snowmelt. “We camped at one spot where we saw the river bank move 75 feet in less than two hours,” Jantz said. “So the [race] course is constantly changing.” But despite — or maybe because of — the challenges, these engineers enjoyed their time on “Alaska Off Road Warriors.” “For me and Carl, it’s two months of jeeping,” Rudman said. “We’re having fun. This is playing.” Freelance writer Rob Owen: RobOwenTV@gmail.com or on Facebook and Twitter as RobOwenTV Bottom Line: Whatever the weather, enjoy it ... it’s only weather.

Here is some off-road

news:

Off-roading at issue in Pendleton By Thomas Prohaska of The Buffalo News PENDLETON – The Town Board probably will make a decision Dec. 8 on whether the use of off-road vehicles, such as dirt bikes, all- terrain vehicles and snowmobiles, violates the town zoning ordinance. Read more Mudding accident off Card Sound Road kills 9- year-old boy BY PATRICK RILEYPRILEY of the MIAMIHERALD.COM A 9-year-old boy died in a mudding accident east of Card Sound Road, Miami-Dade police said Monday. Read more Even at 20 below, Northwest ‘Off Road Warriors’ jeeped on By Rob Owen Special to The Seattle Times In the History Channel’s new competition series “Alaska Off Road Warriors,” which premieres Sunday, Nov. 30, two Western Washington engineers are introduced as non- Alaska outsiders. Read More

Here are some off-

road resources:

off-road reading cheap auto insurance online off-road warehouse off-road goodies